• J.G. MacLeod

On Writing: The Inspirational Reflections of Author Ivy Logan.

Updated: Aug 8

Beautiful dreamer. Joyful writer. Passionate reader. Supportive friend. Ivy Logan embodies all of these descriptions, and more.

Meet Ivy Logan:

Ivy Logan is the author of Broken, an imaginative work that combines themes of coming-of-age, friendship, and sacrifice in a supernatural setting. To purchase Broken, click the link below:


 

I was delighted that Ivy agreed to share some of her writing journey with my readers. When I first learned that she had written a book about a strong sorceress, an ancient prophecy, and a troubling darkness, I wondered what had motivated her to become a writer initially. Her response was intriguing:

Rather than a decision, it was an organic progression.
I loved stories ever since I could remember. Stories, my father told me left me enthralled, movies I watched drew me into their world and books, I just had to devour them. This romance with books started when I was around five years old.
When stories live in you, you read of course but the natural evolution is to write. But still I hesitated. After I achieved a lot of my career goals and was focused on my young family, my husband reminded me that I always longed to write. What’s stopping you? he asked.
Nothing but my self-doubt and lack of self-belief! But that question was a trigger that started me on my writing journey. I found my calling. I found my world.

Ivy's early relationship with reading is deeply connected to family. I appreciate this association between being read to and being swept away by the tall tales in books, because many writers can remember being similarly captivated by storytelling in their childhoods. The progression of Ivy's love of stories into a successful career as a published author feels natural.


As you can see, Ivy's book, Broken, contains themes and plot devices that are timeless. Readers want fantasy stories with both danger AND love. The romance Ivy describes when she speaks about escaping into stories is also evident in her own writing. Readers will find fantasy and love in an Ivy Logan book.


I was intrigued by the descriptions of Ivy's strong, female characters and I asked her to describe a favourite character or story arc.

My body of work is a series called The Breach Chronicles. It is set against a fantasy setting but I must add the fantasy never overwhelms the theme of the story.
My stories are deeply etched in the intricacies of relationships and the paths they take us on. For that reason my favorite character is Katie. She is not the protagonist. But I’m tempted to write her a book of her own. She is the daughter of the protagonist in BOOK I, Broken, Talia. In BOOK I she appears as a little girl. BOOK III Redemption, sees her reappears out of the blue, now an adult.
Katie is everything I would want my daughter to be. Smart, independent, sassy and supportive. She solves her own problems and she protects and saves the male protagonist, without giving it another thought.
Best of all I like her for a decision, which she makes toward the end of, BOOK III, Redemption. I can’t say what it is because I don’t want to reveal the storyline. But needless to say, that’s the kind of girl I like and admire - girls who believe in love but have their own lives and their own paths.
I almost chose to give her a more traditional closure. But she would not have it. You know when your characters speak to you and choose their own path? That’s what Katie Camden did. For that reason I like her best of all.
BOOK II, Metamorphosis
BOOK II, Metamorphosis

Katie sounds like a remarkable young woman. I agree with Ivy that her characteristics are ones that I also admire. I hope my daughters continue to embrace these qualities of independence, intelligence, and ingenuity as they mature.


Sometimes, when authors are writing a story arc, their characters come alive and do strange or unexpected things. Ivy said that the character who fits this description is Amelia, the protagonist of BOOK II, Metamorphosis.

Amelia is human. She has no clue she comes from a bloodline of sorceresses. Orphaned at a young age, Amelia has been raised by an uncle who emotionally abuses her. As a result while the world thinks she is rich, spoiled and privileged, Amelia goes through a phase where she is afraid of her own shadow.
By virtue of a boon from her sorceress grandmother, she transforms into a shapeshifter. That’s the strangest thing that could have happened to her and also the best thing.
She discovers her own strengths and starts a rebellion to rehabilitate slaves who mine blood diamonds. Her transition is bizarre but helps her find her purpose in life.
Metamorphosis is called The ‘Girl With No Face’ because Amelia keeps adapting to others around her and situations until she realizes it is imperative for her to first find herself.

Amelia's struggles intrigue me, and I look forward to delving deeper into this series. The theme of hardship, overcoming abuse, and growing into a leader show the underlying power of Ivy's work.


When I asked what Ivy was currently working on, she mentioned how she has

author friends who are working on multiple projects together. Writing as well as editing simultaneously. I envy them. I am only able to focus on my series, The Breach Chronicles right now with BOOK II, Metamorphosis and BOOK III, Redemption being in different stages of editing. I don’t mind the delays. The books have to be near perfect before they reach the final reader.

Writing is both a creative pursuit, and a business for many authors. I asked Ivy to dispel one misconception about writing as a career.

I have seen writers declare, Writing is a lonely profession. For me it has been anything but that. I think it’s the kind of space you are functioning from. If you are ‘ONLY ME’ focused then yes, writing is lonely. You only see yourself and that gets sad.
If you open your heart and minds to others , established writers, writers starting off, and readers then the world can become an amazing place. Suddenly you will find you have your own tribe. Friends who are almost family, friends who you support and support you in turn. The biggest plus, you will be far from alone.
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This is important advice for any writer, but I asked Ivy to give another piece of advice specifically for the newbie crowd.

Believe in your book because if you don’t who else will?” But I temper this with another bit of advice, “Be open to feedback.” Seek feedback from alpha readers, beta readers, editors, and readers. Keep learning. Don’t equate feedback with hate for you and your book. At the same time don’t let feedback break you. Sometimes haters misuse ‘Feedback’. Always take the parts you can use and discard the harsh and catty comments. They serve no purpose. Keep improving. Perfection is a journey. Don’t get off the road before you get there.
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Feedback comes in many forms. Beta readers are priceless in this craft, as are those who are willing to review published books, and provide encouragement for each step of this journey. It is clear that relationships and connection are very important to Ivy.

One thing, people should know, I’m sometimes a teenager, sometimes a kid at heart. In reality, I’m a grown-up with two kids. I’m a very mature person when people need me, while playing the mom card etc. But at heart, I’m very exuberant and childlike. I try not to get tainted and jaded by selfishness and hate. Once you are my person, I will always be there for you.

According to Ivy Logan,

inspiration is a never-ending process. It is a gift that never stops giving.

Profound words, indeed. Ivy has certainly helped us to think about the many layers of this creative endeavour.

Spread Love
Spread Love

Reviews are also inspirational for authors. Please consider leaving a review after you read Broken.



 

I wish to extend a huge thank you to Ivy Logan for being a guest on Artists Helping Artists. Please follow her on Twitter & Facebook.




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